In terms of ailments, gum disease probably doesn’t get the respect it deserves. It’s actually a very serious illness that can have longstanding effects if not addressed. Fortunately, if you implement a regular oral hygiene habit, gum disease doesn’t have to be a risk you need to worry about.

WebMD points out that there are actually two different types of gum disease. These are:

  • Gingivitis
  • Periodontitis

Both are infections that attack the bones and tissues that support your teeth. Obviously, it’s of the utmost importance that these features stay healthy and intact. Without them (or even if they’re just severely compromised), you can expect that your teeth will suffer or even fall out.

Gingivitis is considered to be the milder version of the two. That doesn’t mean it’s something you want to court, though. It affects solely the gums that surround your teeth.

Periodontitis actually gets below the gum line. Once it’s breached the gums, it starts going to work on the bones of your jaw. You can lose teeth, parts of your jaw and suffer many more problems when this happens.

Fortunately, gum disease is completely preventable. While some people may be genetically predisposed to gum disease more than others, that’s hardly a reason to become apathetic.

If you want to keep your mouth free of gum disease, start by brushing twice a day. Each time should last at least two minutes. You also need to floss every day, too. Use an antibacterial mouthwash for improved results, and, as if you needed another reason, quit smoking if you currently do.

Unfortunately, by the time you notice gum disease, it could be too late to reverse some of the damage, warns WebMD. That’s why it’s so important that you see a dentist regularly. Their professional exams can catch the red flags you may miss in time to do something about it.

In the Bay Area, Dr. Mack Jafari knows what the warning signs of gum disease look like and what to do about them. Even if you believe you’re unaffected at the moment, making an appointment is the only way to know for sure.

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/gums-problems-gingivitis

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